NECA Study Abroad Italy Programs
NECA Programs

Click below for more information and Program schedules:

  

:: Summer Program 2017 ::
June 4 - June 30

 
3-6 credits


:: Fall Semester 2017 ::
Sept 11 - Dec 10

up to 18 credits


:: Spring Semester 2018 ::
Jan 28 - Apr 28

up to 18
 credits


:: Other Programs ::
Educational Guided Tours
Alumni Programs


Subsequent Programs to be announced
(see the Apply on-line web page)

 

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FIELDS OF STUDY and COURSES
(Upper Di
vision Courses)

Three-credit Courses
, taught in English, except for the Italian language courses.
For COURSE DESCRIPTIONS and course codes (1) CLICK on the course title below  OR  2) SCROLL DOWN the page.
All courses are PERMANENTLY OFFERED except where noted.


At NECA it is possible to take courses in other fields (not listed on this website) if students require other courses to fulfill degree requirements – In such cases NECA customizes programs for students who need to earn credits in specific fields.



ART HISTORY / ARCHITECTURE / STUDIO ARTS
Art History of the Italian Renaissance (Giotto to Michelangelo)
Art History
Photography: Florentine Portfolio
Studio Art
Relief Sculpture in Florence
Studio Art
Relief Sculpture: Casting and The Narrative
Studio Art
Room and Space in Tuscany
Architecture/Studio Art/Design
Survey of Florentine Architecture
Architecture/Fine Arts/History
The Illustrative Image and the Making of a Book
Studio Art
Watercolor Painting: Postcards Home
Studio Art/Composition
Women and Art in Italy
Art History/Women's Studies/Sociology


 

BUSINESS / ECONOMICS
Economic Globalization and Human Rights
Economics/History/International Law
Environmentally Sustainable Businesses in Tuscany
Business/Economics/Sociology
Italy and the European Union
Political Science/Business/Economics
The Roots of Capitalism
Business/Economics/History
Understanding Immigration
Economics/History/Sociology

 

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HISTORY / POLITICAL SCIENCE / SOCIOLOGY
Contemporary Florence
Italian Studies/Humanities/Sociology
Economic Globalization and Human Rights
Economics/History/International Law
Italian Contribution to Western Civilization
Italian Studies/History/Humanities
Italian Fashion through the Ages
History/Sociology/Fine Arts/Gender Studies
Italian Identity Today
Humanities/Sociology/Italian Studies
Italy and the European Union
Political Science/Business/Economics
Italy as a Nation
Italian Studies/History/Political Science/Sociology
The Roots of Capitalism
Business/Economics/History
Understanding Immigration
Economics/History/Sociology

 

 

ITALIAN LANGUAGE
Elementary Italian 1
Experiental learning language course
Elementary Italian 2
Experiental learning language course
Intermediate Italian 1
Experiental learning language course
Intermediate Italian 2
Experiental learning language course
Conversation and Composition in Italian 1 (Advanced Italian 1)
Experiental learning language course
Conversation and Composition in Italian 2 (Advanced Italian 2)
Experiental learning language course

 

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ITALIAN STUDIES
Contemporary Florence
Italian Studies/Humanities/Sociology
Florence & Italian Literature in Translation (Dante to Machiavelli)
Literature/Humanities/Italian Studies
Italian Cinema
Film/Performing Arts/Humanities
Italian Contribution to Western Civilization
Italian Studies/History/Humanities
Italian Fashion through the Ages
History/Sociology/Fine Arts/Gender Studies
Italian Identity Today
Humanities/Sociology/Italian Studies
The Roots of Capitalism
Business/Economics/History

 

 

 LIBERAL STUDIES / HUMANITIES
Contemporary Florence
Italian Studies/Humanities/Sociology
Florence & Italian Literature in Translation (Dante to Machiavelli)
Literature/Humanities/Italian Studies
Italian Cinema
Film/Performing Arts/Humanities
The Roots of Capitalism
Business/Economics/History
Writing & Creativity
Composition/Humanities/Literature

 

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PSYCHOLOGY / ANTHROPOLOGY
Cultural Psychology: Methods and Concepts
Psychology/Anthropology course
Cultural Psychology: Disease and Mental Disorders
Psychology/Anthropology course


ENGINEERING / SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS / ECONOMICS
Introduction to Biogas Plants
Engineering/Business/Economics
Understanding Wind Energy
Engineering/Business/Economics

Discovering Solar Power

Engineering/Business/Economics

Innovation of Photovoltaic Tech - Solar Electric

Engineering/Business/Economics




COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
(
Upper Division Courses in alphabetical order, except for courses of the

Renewable Energy & Environmental Technology Program, last descriptions)


All courses are PERMANENTLY OFFERED except where noted below.

 

At NECA it is possible to take courses in other fields (not listed on this website) if students require other courses to fulfill degree requirements – In such cases NECA customizes programs for students who need to earn credits in specific fields.

 


Art History of the Italian Renaissance (Giotto to Michelangelo)

(Art History) - ART304
This course concentrates on Renaissance Art within the history of art in Florence and the surrounding area. Points of study encompassed include: Rome and antiquity's role in the revival of classical ideals; the roots of the Renaissance in the later medieval art of Florence and the nearby rival towns of Pisa and Siena; Florence's civic identity during its great flourish; the Early Renaissance of the 1400s; and the emergence of the High Renaissance masters Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael. The instruction will be mainly on site, with field trips to view Florence's famed monuments, masterworks, and museums. Students will experience firsthand the artistic achievements of the Florentine Renaissance and Italian art.

Contemporary Florence
Offered Fall and Spring
(Italian Studies/Humanities/Sociology) - ITA222
PREREQ: Elementary Italian 1. However, this course can be chosen also by absolute beginners enrolled in Elementary Italian 1, since the semester schedule allows students to take first Elementary Italian 1 and then Contemporary Florence.
This is an experiential learning course, taught in English and partially at an appropriate level of Italian. For the part in Italian, the course is taught in order to allow even those students with a very limited knowledge of the language to grasp fundamental ideas and concepts and also to further develop their language skills. We will study how people work today and how they worked centuries ago, trying to note and identify the differences and similarities, keeping in mind the character and nature of Florentines, always inclined to irony, sarcasm, humor, and witty criticism. We will examine particular trades, habits, customs, social issues, and traditions that have made Florence a center for Western culture and civilization.
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Cultural Psychology: Methods and Concepts

Offered Fall and Spring

(Psychology/Anthropology) - IND347E
Over twenty years ago the cultural anthropoligist Richard A. Shweder asked the question"Does the concept of the person vary cross-culturally?" This course will analyze the effects of culture on human development and behavior. The course will also address the theory that individuals living in different cultures still have the same behaviors, feelings, thoughts, and attitudes, arguing that there are common behaviors universal to all individuals in human development. Once students are provided with an overview of recent studies, they will be expected to evaluate these theories and to put them into practice by examining their own experience living abroad in a different culture.


Cultural Psychology: Disease and Mental Disorders
Offered Fall and Spring

(Psychology/Anthropology) - IND347F
This course will examine the disputed theory that recognizes culture-specific mental disorders and diseases. Students will evaluate if the roots of abnormal behaviors and conditions, such as eating disorders or depression, can be found in specific cultures or societies. The course will introduce the most common abnormalities and will evaluate how these have been treated in the past. Not only the question of whether or not a specific syndrome should be recognized as a socially- or culturally-based phenomena will be addressed, but the course will also consider if a cultural approach could lead to a more adequate and effective treatment and healing compared to other forms of treatment. Also the ethical repercussions of this method will be evaluated in terms of how it can change the way human development can be studied on a global level.

Economic Globalization and Human Rights
Offered Fall and Spring
(Economics/History/International Law) - IND347G
Economic globalization has revolutionized the movement of goods, services, technology, and capital. However, it has also led to fierce competition among the world’s economic and legal systems. We have seen how companies based in states with higher standards with regard to human rights, labor laws, environmental protection, health and safety, intellectual property, and tax laws have eluded these regulations and their inherent costs by conducing their activity abroad. Most states that host these multinational companies are developing countries that need these investments for the growth of their economies. It is in these states’ interest to maintain the lowest possible standards in order to attract foreign investments. The immediate effects seem positive also for mass consumers who benefit from cheaper products, but in the long-run what are the consequences of the absence of minimum global standards? To what extent are both laborers and consumers being put at risk? This course will identify the effects of globalization, its historical, economic, social, cultural, and also legal consequences. The course will also address the problem of multinational companies’ lack of accountability and the question of responsibility of the state for the behavior of its multinational companies abroad.


Environmentally Sustainable Businesses in Tuscany
Offered Fall and Spring

(Business/Economics/Sociology) - IND347A
Following the increasing awareness about environmental degradation throughout the past two decades, Tuscany is progressively filling up with small environmentally-conscious businesses. The course focuses on the new role played by these companies. The course kicks off with a brief overview of the economic outline of the country as well as its cultural predisposition towards the growth of small family companies, which above all in Tuscany play an essential role. It then identifies a particular group of local environmentally-conscious companies and engages in an interactive assessment of their ideology, their innovation, and mostly their impact on the economy, the environment and the consumer.

Florence & Italian Literature in Translation (Dante to Machiavelli
)
(Literature/Humanities) - LIT310
This course will study the pivotal role of Florence in the development of Italian vernacular literature during the Medieval and Renaissance periods. Readings, discussions, and written essays will be made upon the major genres of this period (lyric poetry, the novella, autobiography, theatrical comedy, chronicles, biographies, saints' lives, and epistles). The major authors and lyric poets including those of the Sicilian school will be covered. The pre- and post-Boccaccian novellistica will also be addressed, as well as other biographical and historical texts to deepen students' understanding of how literature was produced and received in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. These readings will also provide a springboard for discussing historical and social concerns.
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Italian Cinema
Offered Fall and Spring
(Film/Performing Arts/Humanities) - LIT315
The course introduces the student to the world of Italian Cinema. The first part of the course will analyze Neorealism, a cinematic phenomenon that deeply influenced the ideological and aesthetic rules of film art. The second part will concentrate on the films that mark the decline of Neorealism and the talent of "new" auteurs such as Fellini, Antonioni, and Visconti. The last part of the course will be devoted to the cinema from 1970's to the present in order to pay attention to the latest developments of the Italian industry. The course is a general analysis of the history of post-war cinema and a parallel social history of this period using film as "decoded historical evidence". The screenings will include films of the Italian directors of the "cinema d'autore".

Italian Contribution to Western Civilization

(Italian Studies/History/Humanities) - IND447
This course will survey Italy's contribution to Western Civilization by covering major themes in Western European political, social, religious, intellectual, and cultural history, from the Renaissance through the 20th century. The course will introduce the major intellectual Italian movements and examine how they have contributed to the development of modern Western Civilization. We will analyze how Italian genius and intellectual culture has helped to define modernity and how innovations and breakthrough discoveries made by Italians have influenced many aspects of our daily life, in the fields of science, education, arts, and politics.
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Italian Fashion through the Ages
Offered Fall and Spring
(History/Sociology/Fine Arts/Gender Studies) - IND347H
The way we dress says much about who we are and what we value. This course will examine how fashion has been a way for people to express moral concerns, aesthetic taste, and social status throughout history. This course is a survey of the history of costume in the Western world with particular emphasis on Italy, from antiquity to modern times. Various primary sources such literary texts, works of art, and actual garments (with museum visits) will be analyzed to define the characteristics of costume for each historical period. The course aims to identify and examine the forces that have governed fashion styles such as sumptuary laws and moral codes of behavior. The production of jewelry and the demand and trade of luxury goods will also be covered. Students will study how fashion styles have changed as a consequence of war, economic prosperity or depression, and technological developments, and how fashion styles of the past continue to inspire.


Italian Identity Today
Offered Fall and Spring
(Humanities/Sociology/Italian Studies) - IND347D
This course is an introduction to current Italian culture and identity. We will explore the role played by different aspects of Italian culture in the definition and perception of "italianness." The aim of the course is to give students a better understanding of the complexities of Italian identity, examining the roots of regional differences while at the same time identifying common characteristics shared by all Italians. Part of the course will also focus on how Italians are considered by other cultures and the various stereotypes, as conveyed in literature, film, and popular culture. Students will also explore issues of cultural awareness, drawing from their own experience of living in Italy.

Italy and the European Union

(Political Science/Business/Economics) - IND320
The European Union has proven itself to be the largest, most complex and most controversial "political and economic synthesis" of recent history. Why? What "historical evolution" gave birth to what we know today as the European Union, an initially economic cooperative scheme that brought to the region the longest uninterrupted "peace" in its recorded history? Which are the main governing "institutions" of the EU and how do they work? Which are the most important "integration policies" being pursuit? What will become of it? Looking from the perspective of a single member state, the case of Italy, what do you see? How has Italy shaped the EU process and how has the EU shaped the Italian process from a political, economic, and sociological point of view?
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Italy as a Nation

(Italian Studies/History/Political Science/Sociology) - IND347C
The course is an introduction to the major themes of modern Italian history and culture, from the period of unification (1861) to present-day, with a special focus on the 20th century. We will examine how Italian intellectuals contributed to the development of Italy as a nation through a survey of primary sources (traditional texts, art, music, and cinema), spanning from the Medieval and Renaissance age, through the Age of Nationalism, to modern times. The political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of Italy's history will be covered, focusing on the major historic events, which have had an impact on the formation of the collective consciousness. We will compare pre-modern and modern elements in Italian life and analyze how unification has been a controversial issue, studying the conflict among the cultures of the North and South of the Italian peninsula.

Photography: Florentine Portfolio
(Studio Art) - ART355
Students will be introduced to the basic concepts of photography, including camera usage and exposure techniques. They will explore Florence and will make a photo diary of their experience. Photographing in Florence, students will have the great opportunity to record their visual impressions and will be encouraged to use their camera and photographs as tools of creative art. The class will include in-class lessons and on-site work. Darkroom experience is not included in this course. Students are requested to purchase a camera in the U.S. and arrive in Italy with the requested camera for the course.
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Relief Sculpture in Florence
Offered Fall and Spring
(Studio Art) - ART447C
This course will examine the use of low relief sculpture in Florentine art history and use these works to inspire the artist's interpretations of both religious iconography and visual narration. Using simple materials, students will also investigate drawing and painting techniques used as surface decoration for their sculptures. Emphasis will be placed on historical context from which students will be asked to interpret, challenge and transform into their own personal creations. Sculpture techniques may focus on oil clay modelling, mold making, plaster casting, and surface treatment, amongst other possible techniques. This course requires no sculpture or drawing prerequisites and takes advantage of low-maintenance materials to create highly crafted pieces.

Relief Sculpture: Casting and The Narrative
Offered Fall and Spring
(Studio Art) - ART447E
PREREQ: Relief Sculpture in Florence.
Using and strengthening the base modeling and casting skills developed in Relief Sculpture in Florence, this course will provide students the freedom to develop their personal and artistic responses through single and multiple panel/tile sculptures. Students will be required to use the various relief sculpture techniques learned from historical sources that lead to personal narrative and story telling, as well as develop their own creative and unique solutions to the problem of time, sequence, information, etc. Due to the interpretive nature of narration and autobiography, surface decoration techniques will be more fully addressed and students will be encouraged to experiment with their own ideas.
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Room and Space
in Tuscany
(Studio Art/Architecture/Design) - ART406
In the early weeks the course concentrates on the exploration, analysis and documentation of selected sites in Florence, with emphasis on perception, representation and description of the environment. Students develop these concepts through pictures, drawings and written texts collected in a workbook, during sessions of life drawings on-site. Environmental design approach is described by the work of architects and artists, which will complement the analysis of the morphological components of landscape, buildings and furniture. Students will learn about techniques of fast rendering in perspective as used by architects and designers. In the last week students are engaged in translating their Florentine experience into the language of design in the reuse of an existing site in town.

Survey of Florentine Architecture

(Architecture/Fine Arts/History) - ART310
This course will provide students with a basic survey of the history of Architecture, from Roman times through the 20th Century, using the cities of Florence, Siena and Rome as a case study of major movements and issues in architectural and urban design. We will examine the city of Florence from its earliest foundations as a Roman military colony through its great Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque monuments that still define the city today. We will finish the course by looking at the interventions of Poggi and Michelucci in the 19th and 20th Centuries.
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The Illustrative Image and the Making of a Book

(Studio Art) - ART322
In this course students will create a book based on a story (from a literary source or original). A common theme may be decided upon, or each student can propose small stories, observations, or annotations to be illustrated and correlated with images of various formats. Varied illustration techniques (pastels, acrylic, wax, oil, mixed media etc.) as well as creative binding methods will be used and developed. The goal of the course is to give each student the possibility of exploiting to the up most his/her own creative capacity using fantasy and imagination, without feeling restricted only to direct observation from nature.

The Roots of Capitalism
Offered Fall and Spring

(Business/Economics/History) - IND343
This course will focus on the prominent business, economic, historical and sociological conditions and developments which took place during the 12th - 16th century Europe upon which modern capitalistic systems and practices were built on. Emphasis will be given on Renaissance Italy as it has been inevitably the most interesting and phenomenal case. Throughout this course students should develop a clear understanding as to what capitalism is and how it is profoundly associated with historical, sociological and economic changes within the designated place and period of study.
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Understanding Immigration
Offered Fall and Spring
(Sociology/Economics/History) - IND347B
The course comprehensively presents the issue of immigration in Italy. The historical roots as well as the economic impact of such a phenomenon will be introduced offering a framework of the context in question. The rest of the course will focus upon the sociological ramifications such as integration versus assimilation, the flexibility of public education towards minorities' needs, the issue of perceived security, the ability of the public authorities to successfully manage the situation, and others. Students will be required to critically observe and assess the topic of immigration in a new geographic context and to draw parallels with the United States.

Watercolor Painting: Postcards Home

(Studio Art/Composition) - ART347B
Like the Grand Tour of the 17th and 18th centuries, which encouraged young Englishmen to travel and study the masters and ancient relics, often using techniques such as drawing and painting as a way to document the richness of their experiences and share it with those unable to travel, your personal and physical journey through Florence will provide you with a rich assortment of moments, memories, ideas, questions. The objective of this course is to give students a basic understanding of watercolor and ink wash techniques and to provide them the opportunity to achieve a technical and personal means of expression inspired by their individual "Grand Tour" experiences within Florence.
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Women and Art in Italy

(Art History/Women's Studies/Sociology) - IND401
This course will examine the role of women as subjects, artists, and patrons in Italian art. Their roles in the social, political, economic, and cultural life during various periods (mainly Renaissance and Baroque age) will be studied. We will look at how art reflects the perimeters set for women's roles in society and how depictions of women, in the various guises (sinner, saint, heroine), symbolized the virtues, vices, and intangible ideas of Italian culture and learning.
We will also examine how women's roles constrained them in many ways, but also how they provided opportunities for women to build a position for themselves in society. We will then investigate into the lives of exceptional women and understand how they were able to overcome limitations set by society.

Writing & Creativity

(Composition/Humanities/Literature) - CMP301
This interdisciplinary course aims to introduce the student to the world of creative writing, focusing primarily on fiction. What the course offers is an enriching and highly personal experience as the student learns to tap into his or her own life experiences and draw on them. The course is structured around the close study of certain seminal literary texts with a view to analyzing their structures and narrative dynamics. In-class exercises take place, often with highly specified objectives (development of character, introduction of story, scenario, theme, exposition). Students are encouraged during workshops to criticize and inspire each other. The ultimate purpose is to impart something of the tools and craft of creative writing, while nurturing the student's interest in literary art.
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:: ITALIAN LANGUAGE COURSES ::
The NECA language courses, utilizing experiential learning method, has proven to be effective. It allows students to develop their basic language skills and at the same time provides students with fun and motivating opportunities to use the language. Familiarization with the sounds and distinction of individual words form the basis upon which the student begins to build or increase his or her linguistic skills at any level. In order to reproduce authentic situations, some lessons may be held outside the classroom. This permits the student to witness first-hand the direct connection between the language and its culture. Discussions will be carried out to give the student a broad picture of how the language is used.

Elementary Italian 1

(Experiental learning language course) - ITA101
No Placement Test is required. No PREREQ.
Description: See above
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Elementary Italian 2
(Experiental learning language course) - ITA102
Placement Test is required. PREREQ: ITA101.
Description: See above

Intermediate Italian 1

(Experiental learning language course) - ITA105
Placement Test is required. PREREQ: ITA101 and ITA102.
Description: See above
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Intermediate Italian 2

(Experiental learning language course) - ITA106
Placement Test is required. PREREQ: ITA101, ITA102, and ITA105.
Description: See above

Conversation and Composition in Italian 1

(Experiental learning language course) - ITA207
Placement Test is required. PREREQ: ITA101, ITA102, ITA105, and ITA106.
Description: See above
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Conversation and Composition in Italian 2

(Experiental learning language course) - ITA208
Placement Test is required. PREREQ: ITA101, ITA102, ITA105, ITA106, and ITA207.
Description: See above
:: COURSE DESCRIPTIONS OF
RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY ::

 
Introduction to Biogas Plants
(Engineering/Business/Economics) - SCI301

Students will have an understanding of the fundamentals of biogas production and upgrading, as well as of its economic aspects, with focus on codigestion. The success of the Italian (and German) leading biogas markets will be introduced. The course will also introduce future perspectives of biogas. A case study of a biogas plant designed to apply the recent knowledge will be examined. A site visit will be part of the course.


Understanding
Wind Energy
(Engineering/Business/Economics) - SCI302
The course is an introduction to the different technologies used in wind turbines, their advantages and disadvantages. The course will study how much wind we have, how we can connect our wind farm to the grid. Resource assessment and grid connection are two aspects of the project cycle, which will be presented and discussed in detail. A brief introduction to the leading software tool for wind farm planning will be presented. A site visit will illustrate the production and assembling of the components.


Discovering Solar Power

(Engineering/Business/Economics) - SCI303
The course provides an understanding of PV solar power and the basics of PV technology. Resource assessment, planning, and managing of PV projects will be discussed. An overview of the whole PV project life cycle will be presented: choice of location, energy yield assessment, technology and construction, operation, and maintenance. A field trip will offer the possibility of viewing modern PV components.

Innovation of Photovoltaic Tech - Solar Electric

(Engineering/Business/Economics) - SCI304
This course offers a detailed look into Photovoltaic technology with discussion on the design and functioning of grid-connected and off-grid Photovoltaics, solar cells and inverters, planning of photovoltaic systems, and location and shading of panels, as well as the storage types and characteristics. Storage technology, one of the most important aspects for the development of renewable energy, is especially important in emerging nations. The course will illustrate how photovoltaic systems are installed. A site visit will be part of the course.



NOTE ON ITALIAN LANGUAGE COURSES

For Non-Beginners ONLY:
If you are a Non-Beginner in Italian and want to enroll in a NECA program, you should complete the Placement Test and e-mail the answers as an attachment in Word to neca@necaflorence.com.

Go to the Test your Italian web page for the test.


DIRECTED STUDY AND INDIVIDUALIZED PROGRAM

NECA offers for every Program the possibility for each student to apply for a Directed Study and/or Individualized Program. Interested students can send NECA their requests of courses on the on-line application.


Some program excursions off the beaten path:

Excursion to Pratolino, to Villa Demidoff, in the Florentine hills.
One-day excursion to the Tuscan town of Pisa.
One-day excursion to the Tuscan town of Siena.
Excursion to Montebeni, Settignano, in the Florentine hills. Typical Florentine lunch together.
Excursion to the open-air market at the Cascine Park.
Excursion to the area of San Frediano & Porta Romana.
Morning & afternoon visit to the area of Pozzolatico, a visit to the Florentine countryside and farms. Walking tour.
Excursion to San Lorenzo & San Ambrogio open-air markets and some characteristic eateries.
Two- or Three-day excursion to Rome.
Visit to Piazzale Michelangelo and to the 1,000-year old Church of San Miniato.
Morning visit in the historical center and walking tour through the city's history in the hills: via San Leonardo, Arcetri, Torre del Gallo, Pian dei Giullari, Santa Margherita a Montici.
Morning & afternoon visit to the countryside of Greve in Chianti and Castellina in Chianti, with visit to Etruscan tombs.
Morning & afternoon visit to the area of Olmo, and visit to the Florentine countryside and farms. Walking tour.
Afternoon visit to Impruneta, the land of artistic terracotta production.
♦ Visit to the hill of Fiesole (see below), including via Vecchia Fiesolana and Badia Fiesolana.


 

The Hill of Fiesole | NECA students on the terrace overlooking the town

 

 






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